Journal

The Land Of Lefts In Peru

In the search for consistency of good waves, we crossed the border from Ecuador into Peru. Crossing in the middle of the night, we had missed the transition from greenery to desert. Peru welcomes you was obvious with the change of landscape. Our first stop was Mancora, a town to enjoy if all you want to do is drink a lot. The wave here was small and overcrowded.

We wanted to surf Lobitos (the land of barrels) but with a swell 4 days away we decided to find a break before it to chill out in. Los Organos was where we stopped. 1 hour later we were on the bus again. A very creepy town and an unpleasant experience involving a challenged local simulating a gun with his hand at us left us wondering why we even bothered to exit the bus here.

Unfortunately we didn't surf Lobitos as we arrived 4 nights too early for the swell and could only hold out in this town for 2 nights as boredom in this town can hit quickly and easily especially with the lack of produce to by and places to eat. 2 dogs locked their sites on Bronnie from a mile away. 1 of which was able to hit their target. Bronnie's ankle; no skin was pierced so we were pleasantly relieved.

We bee lined it straight for Puerto Chicama via a night in Trujillo.

Chicama

Puerto Chicama, the light blue hostel is Él Hombres

Apparently Chicama is one of the longest waves in the world. We were in ore at this place. We would wake up just as light was bearing its face, pull on our wetsuits and stuff our mouth with a banana. Often we would be the only ones out there for the first round of waves. This was a good tactic because often there would be at least 1 rubber ducky start up at 9am with its main aim of pissing all the paddle surfers off. These rubber duckies would drop someone off right on the take off when a good set would come through. Rendering you useless to compete as the current being so strong had already dragged you off to the side. Once the people using the ducky would finish their wave. The ducky would be there to pick them up again. Usually 800 meters down the line but sometimes earlier depending on the length of the wave. It was a great day watching from the balcony of El Hombres, when a ducky flipped over and was swamped by a wave in the sandpit. The sandpit is where the take off is on the 1st point where the water really shallows out. There is a lot of sand churning around in it, hence the name sandpit.